Boundary Setting

Brittney GiacchettaPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

When people talk about setting boundaries, what does this mean? People who set boundaries are defining what they are comfortable with and how they would like to be treated by others. This applies to all relationships you may have – with a friend, family member, romantic partner, at work, a neighbour, or anyone else in your life. Examples of boundaries: … Read More

Developing Self-Care Habits

Danielle DuskaPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

In the 24-hour day, there may be moments of no mental health distress, which may occur when you’re sleeping (unless you experience nightmares), watching a film, or perhaps partaking in an activity with a loved one. However, most of us will experience mental health distress at least once a day, if not more. To mitigate feeling trapped or drained by … Read More

Loneliness in Canada

Katie LairdPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

Many Canadian struggle with loneliness, especially due to the ongoing pandemic. According to experts, loneliness is not about being alone; it is about feeling alone despite wanting social connections. It is perceived as involuntary separation, abandonment, rejection or isolation from others. Statistics of Loneliness in Canada: In Canada, 13% of people 15 and over reported always or often feeling lonely … Read More

Stages of Grief

Brittney GiacchettaPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

Grief is a universal experience that impacts everyone at some point in their lives. It may be from the death of a loved one, the loss of a relationship, the loss of a job or any event that alters your life as you know it. Despite being a universal experience, grief is also incredibly individual. There is no right or … Read More

Toxic Positivity

Danielle DuskaPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

“When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” “Look on the brightside of things.” “It could always be worse.” “Focus on the positive.” “Don’t worry, you can do it.” “Other people have it way worse.” Like the above quotes, most of us have received or provided a positive response to a less-than-positive situation. When used appropriately, positivity can be an adaptive … Read More

The Three E’s of Trauma

Katie LairdPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

Trauma is “challenging emotional consequences that living through a distressing event can have for an individual”. – The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Dr. Bruce Perry, a leading researcher, clinician and teacher in children’s mental health and neuroscience, explains trauma according to the three E’s:  Event: the traumatic event itself. Large ‘T’ trauma is a significant and extraordinary event … Read More

Working from Home: Adults with ADHD

Danielle DuskaPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

Establishing and maintaining productive work boundaries in the home environment can be particularly challenging for adults with ADHD. Procrastination, difficulty planning, and low frustration tolerance are just a few examples of how ADHD can influence a person’s daily productivity. So in the context of working from home, where there is reduced structure, blurred boundaries, and online communication, the challenges of … Read More

Fight-Flight-Freeze Response

Brittney GiacchettaPsychotherapyLeave a Comment

The fight-flight-freeze response is your body’s reaction to threats (AKA danger). When a threat or danger is perceived, physiological and hormonal changes occur quickly in the body so you can protect yourself. This can be a survival instinct. For example, if you are hiking and see a bear on the trail up ahead, you will remain quiet and still until … Read More